Dublin Travel Guide

Dublin Travel Guide Written for The Falcon News Paper

I visited Ireland over the weekend. And if there was any doubt, Dublin, the land of the green, the ginger, the Guinness, was well, awesome.

Last Thursday, my English friend Emma and I took an early morning train from the Lake District in Northern England to Manchester Airport. We boarded a RyanAir plane for a 30-minute flight to Ireland. It goes without saying that RyanAir is most likely one safety code violation away from being grounded, but regardless, it is a smart and cheap way to fly abroad. Just remember not to check luggage if you are looking to save money. While tickets are roughly 20 pounds, checking luggage is about 150 pounds.

After roughly 5 hours of traveling we reached Dublin at 10 AM; Emma was ready for tea; I was ready for happy hour.  Fortunately for me and unfortunately for Emma, we were not able easily find our Hostel in the maze of unfamiliar cobblestone streets. We ended up chatting with some local Irish who funneled us right into the perfect pub, Kehoe’s. Kehoe’s is just off Graftons Street, next time you just so happen to be in Dublin and have a decent appetite–Kehoe’s is where you should go. It’s the place where the locals linger and has the best bacon and cabbage ever.

When both Emma and I were both finished eating, we managed to waddle down street and find our Hostel. For the weekend, we were staying at the Abigail’s Hostel, which resides right on the riverfront street and in the center of the city life. A perfect location for the walking tourist and poor college student—only 15 Euros a night, which translates to about 20 or so bucks. Abigail’s was not only clean and full of diverse travelers—ranging from young families to solo travelers—but provided you also with a continental breakfast and a fridge to store food in.  

Anxious to explore the city, we dropped off our luggage grabbed a map and headed to the nearest bus stop. Being in Dublin for only a few days is probably one of the best tests of self-control. There is so much to do, see and drink that it’s hard to not completely run a muck.

When looking at the map of Dublin, there are historic sites, beer factories, bookstores, art festivals, bike tours, and more pubs than clovers. The best way to maneuver your way around this is to treat it like how I treat an Ice cream store—taste test everything until you get kicked out.

However, Emma wasn’t so keen on my “we have to see everything” attitude and talked me into making a list limited to 5 places for the long weekend.

This was our list and our take on them:

First, the Kilmainham Gaol: This is the oldest and largest unused jail in Europe. This place gives creepy a whole new meaning. Kilmainham Gaol played an important role in Irish history during the first part of the 20th century by housing and executing some of the greatest Irish revolutionaries such as Maud Gonne, Y.B. Yeats former lover. I highly recommend going on the tour (only 4 Euros for students) and learning more about its haunted history. I promise you that it completely surpasses “Current Day Haunts” on Discovery Channel. Currently it has been converted into a Museum and pub, the perfect combination  for a thirsty-ghost enthusiast.

Emma n Jail
Emma in Kilmainham Gaol

Second, the Dublin Castle: It’s about three times older than the United States  and more regal than our very own bald eagle. Tours are a little spendy and depending on who your guide is, can actually be quite dry. But if you’ve never been in a castle before, this is worth trying to fit into your budget. The ornate decoration and grandeur rooms are breathtaking and incomparable to anything back home.  

Castle
Sneaking a photo in the Dublin Castle

 

Third, Guinness Factory: Need I say more? I don’t think I do. Just do it.

Fourth, Secret of Kells: If you’re like me and get your ya-ya’s from Illuminated manuscripts check out The Book of Kells at Dublin’s Trinity University. It’s the first illuminated manuscript ever and way cooler than what Google Images makes it out to be. Congrats on finally beating England to the punch in something, Ireland.

Last, Pick a pub, Any pub: Now, if you are not interested in any of the previous recommendations you must at least wander the streets until you hear drinking songs loud enough from the inside of pubs that they echo down the streets. Then you must go into that pub and order a pint. My most memorable experience was walking into The Audlin Dubliner to live music and a sea of drunk Irish. It was 8 pm and we were just hoping to burn some time before we were to see Breakfast at Tiffany’s at a local theater, (yes, they do have little theaters playing classic favorites year round). But what we got was so much more than that.

We pushed our way to the bar, ordered a drink and watched the music and the chaos unfold. There was only one man with a guitar but everyone was singing. Every song was introduced as an ”Irish Song”, even though they definitely were singing”La Bamba” and “American Pie.” 

Old Irish drinking songs were belted from beer filled bellies and as the sun went down, the lights dimmed and the space grew sparse. I don’t think I will ever find anywhere in America that will match Ireland’s standard of community. It truly was a like finding a four-leaf clover.

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